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Joint Laboratory for Bilingualism established by CUHK and Cambridge

Prof. Virginia Yip, Co-Director of the Cambridge - CUHK Joint Laboratory for Bilingualism

Prof. Virginia Yip, Co-Director of the Cambridge – CUHK Joint Laboratory for Bilingualism

The University of Cambridge – Chinese University of Hong Kong Joint Laboratory for Bilingualism was officially launched at the inaugural International Conference on Bilingualism: Language and Heritage in December 2017. The Laboratory, co-directed by Prof. Virginia Yip of CUHK and Prof. Boping Yuan of the University of Cambridge (Cambridge), will draw on the strengths and expertise from the two universities and the global community to facilitate international research in bilingualism across the lifespan from infancy and early childhood to adulthood, across diverse contexts, and promote the linguistic and cognitive benefits of bilingualism and multilingualism.

 

From left: Prof. Virginia Yip, Prof. Boping Yuan, Co-Directors of the Cambridge - CUHK Joint Laboratory for Bilingualism, Sir David K. P. Li, Chairman of the Friends of Cambridge in Hong Kong, Prof. Joseph Sung, then Vice-Chancellor and President, CUHK, Prof. Fanny Cheung, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Prof. Patrick Wong, Director of Brain and Mind Institute officiate at the opening ceremony of the International Conference on Bilingualism: Language and Heritage.

From left: Prof. Virginia Yip, Prof. Boping Yuan, Co-Directors of the Cambridge – CUHK Joint Laboratory for Bilingualism, Sir David K. P. Li, Chairman of the Friends of Cambridge in Hong Kong, Prof. Joseph Sung, then Vice-Chancellor and President, CUHK, Prof. Fanny Cheung, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Prof. Patrick Wong, Director of Brain and Mind Institute officiate at the opening ceremony of the International Conference on Bilingualism: Language and Heritage.

The theme of the International Conference on Bilingualism was bilingualism through the lens of the intricate relationship of language and heritage, in particular the acquisition of language as a way to preserve and maintain a speaker’s and community’s heritage and the challenges posed to language learners, researchers and educators. The conference also featured two panels that were of interest to a wide audience from a diversity of disciplines, as well as the general public. The panels brought together researchers and practitioners from different countries and regions including Australia, UK, USA, mainland China, Hong Kong and Singapore to give an international perspective on issues involved in nurturing bilingualism in early childhood and in heritage bilingualism, in different contexts.

 

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